24 vs. 48 Hour Sous Vide Chuck Roast

14 Jan
24-Hour Sous Vide Chuck Roast

24-Hour Sous Vide Chuck Roast

I’ve been slowly learning the best methods and temperatures to cook meat via the sous vide method. For those of you not familiar with this, I’ll give you a cheat link over to Wikipidia: Sous Vide Cooking.

So about three weeks ago I decided to cook a piece of chuck roast for 48 hours at 149 F, but about halfway through the cooking time my foodie friend and sous vide guru Stefan gave me the sage advice that I would achieve the results my hubby desired in said chunk of meat by cooking it only 24 hours at a higher temperature. Horrors, what was I to do? So I threw caution to the wind and bumped it up to 165 F for the last 24 hours. It came out out fall apart tender and my husband said it was the best chuck roast he had ever tasted.

I had only used half of the chuck roast, so two weeks later I decided to try only 24 hours at 165 F for the second half. It was very tender, but both of us thought the first one had the perfect texture. Don’t get me wrong, it was absolutely delicious, the first one was just amazingly absolutely delicious. Was this a controlled experiment? Heck no. I had too many differences with what I did. Was the first chuck roast the better half of the roast? (It was a 6-pound roast initially.) The first one I only seasoned it then seared in a hot cast iron skillet. For the second one I seasoned it then dusted it heavily with flour before searing, as I wanted a thicker gravy than the first one. Did the flour have anything to do with the texture of the meat? I have no idea. But I did get a thicker gravy!

Anyhoot, since I bothered to take the pictures, I’ll go ahead and step you through the process I did for the second roast. Who knows? Maybe it will prompt you to pick up a sous vide circulator and try it out!

24-Hour Sous Vide Chuck Roast with Gravy

1 3-pound chuck roast
Seasoning spice mix of choice
Ground black pepper and salt
Flour
1 tablespoon high heat oil, such as grapeseed oil
1/2 cup homemade beef stock

First, fill a large pot with water, insert the sous vide circulator, and set the heat at 165 degrees F.

Seasoned Beef

Seasoned Beef

Season the beef liberally with a spice seasoning mix of choice. I used Santorini Sunset seasoning (available from Kouzouna’s Kitchen). Grind a bunch of black pepper over it, and lightly salt if your seasoning mix does not contain salt. Pat the roast all around with flour until it is thoroughly coated.

Coated with Flour

Coated with Flour

Heat a cast iron skillet to high heat and add the tablespoon of oil. Sear the roast on all sides until it is browned and crusty.

Seared Chuck Roast

Seared Chuck Roast

Place the roast in a gallon zip-top freezer bag, then remove all the air by zipping it almost shut and slowly immersing it into the pot of water until all the air is sucked out of the bag, then finish sealing the bag.

Ready to Cook for 24 Hours

Ready to Cook for 24 Hours

Cover the pot with cling-wrap to prevent evaporation. Now go find something to do for the next 24 hours, like eat your dinner, watch a movie, sleep, get up and do laundry, or whatever you find yourself doing for the next day.

Cooked Roast and Juices

Cooked Roast and Juices

About 20 minutes before you want to eat the roast, turn off the sous vide, remove the bag from the pot, and remove the roast from the bag, saving the juices in the bag. Set the roast aside on a plate and cover with foil while you make the gravy.

Showing off my Poppa's Hook

Showing off my Poppa’s Hook ~ I love my meat hook!

Pour the juices from the bag into a skillet set over medium-high heat. Add the 1/2 cup beef stock to it. Bring the sauce up to a simmer, and whisk constantly while keeping a simmer until the gravy has reduced and thickened.

Making the Gravy

Making the Gravy

To finish the gravy, add a half tablespoon of very cold butter and stir it in until just melted. Strain the gravy through a sieve (I also line it with mesh or cheesecloth) into a serving bowl.

Smooth Beef Gravy

Smooth Beef Gravy

Serve the fall-apart tender meat with the gravy and sides of vegetables. We had rosemary buttered baby potatoes with green beans.

24-Hour Sous Vide Chuck Roast

24-Hour Sous Vide Chuck Roast

Download and Print this Recipe

Download and Print this Yummy Recipe!

 

 

 

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66 Responses to “24 vs. 48 Hour Sous Vide Chuck Roast”

  1. Cheryl "Cheffie Cooks" Wiser January 14, 2017 at 4:12 pm #

    Love beef! xoxoxo ccc

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jodi January 14, 2017 at 4:48 pm #

    Looks delish! I think its hard to go wrong with chuck roast. πŸ™‚ It used to be the cheap cut, but now it has become quite the coveted cut. πŸ™‚

    Like

  3. Gerlinde/Sunnycovechef January 14, 2017 at 5:30 pm #

    This looks delicious , I have to show it to my nephew who is a ” Sous Vide” fan and a scientist.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. thefoodandwinehedonist January 14, 2017 at 5:45 pm #

    Beautiful pics! So the second was only 24 while the first was 48? Was the it that much better to warrant the extra day? (Asks the guy who still doesn’t have one)

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 14, 2017 at 5:50 pm #

      Hey there, thanks! Yes the first one was better at 48, but it spent the first 24 hours at 149F and the second 24 hours at 165F, and I have no clue if that had anything to do with it! I have not read your Top Chef blogs as I’m trying to catch up online with them first, lol!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. NoPlateLikeHome.com January 14, 2017 at 6:36 pm #

    I don’t usually make chuck roast because it is fatty. I make eye roast but I may try a chuck roast because it’s been so long. Maybe I’ll have a change of heart.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. D. Wallace Peach January 14, 2017 at 7:15 pm #

    Wow. That’s cool, Kathryn, but way beyond my ability for a bazillion reasons including an inability to plan. Ha ha. I love it that you experiment and try new things. Hopefully, your husband knows how lucky he is! Have a great Sunday and stay warm. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 14, 2017 at 7:56 pm #

      Thank you Diana! I knew sous vide would not be everyone’s cuppa tea, but hey, I like to try new things! xoxo

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Garfield Hug January 15, 2017 at 12:25 am #

    Scrumptious for sure 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Adam J. Holland January 15, 2017 at 4:35 am #

    So, if I’m reading this correctly, you really can’t go wrong either way. Yes? Looks delicious!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. cookingwithauntjuju.com January 15, 2017 at 4:47 am #

    I’ve heard about this method of cooking – I just have not tried it yet! Looks delicious – any method that makes meat tender and juicy is a plus for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 15, 2017 at 9:48 am #

      Thank you Judi! It makes meat very tender and moist, you just have to be willing to wait for it!

      Like

  10. Teagan Geneviene January 15, 2017 at 5:07 am #

    This looks soooo delicious, Kathryn. Yum! Mega hugs.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Linda January 15, 2017 at 6:19 am #

    I’ve seen this method on tv but haven’t given it a try – perhaps it’s time!! Looks delicious Kathryn! πŸ˜‹

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Lynz Real Cooking January 15, 2017 at 9:38 am #

    As always this sounds and looks so good and amazing! xxoo

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Bernadette January 15, 2017 at 1:28 pm #

    Thanks for the lesson do you think this method is superior to a slow cooker?

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Freda @ Aromatic essence January 15, 2017 at 2:17 pm #

    Looks amazing, Kathryn! Thanks for the detailed method πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Karina Pinella January 15, 2017 at 9:18 pm #

    You sure are a serious cook. I use a pressure cooker. Just so much faster and the results are great. But I can use the gravy tips. I don’t make gravy. I guess I’m not a patient cook like you, or serious enough for that matter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 15, 2017 at 9:45 pm #

      Thank you Karina, I really never considered myself a serious cook, I just like to cook. I work full-time and blog as a hobby. I’ve had an old-fashioned manual pressure cooker since college which I use quite often, and also still have my original Rival Crock Pot from college that gets plenty of work-outs. But my husband kept insisting he wouldn’t eat pork anymore because it was always so dry, so I set out to prove him wrong, which I have now on several occasions since I started using the sous vide to cook it. I know a lot of tips about gravy, perhaps I’ll make a gravy-specific post in the future?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Karina Pinella January 16, 2017 at 5:27 am #

        Doing a post about gravy sounds like a grave idea. I’ve had enough of my gravel tasting gravy. Schedule your gravy train and I’ll hop on board.

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 16, 2017 at 1:24 pm #

        You are too funny! I have no idea when I’ll schedule it but hopefully you’ll see it when I do.. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  16. StefanGourmet January 15, 2017 at 11:28 pm #

    Thanks for the shout out, Kathryn! Your chuck looks great. I’m pretty sure the flour didn’t make any difference to how the roast was cooked inside. The difference between the two versions may just be the longer cooking time (so you could also try 36 or 48 hours at 74C/165F), but I can’t rule out whether the different temperatures also had some special effect. That is something I’d like to experiment with a bit.

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 15, 2017 at 11:43 pm #

      Thank you Stefan, I was looking for your feedback on this. I’m starting to think I like the longer cooking time, but I haven’t done one a straight 48 hours at 165F, remember I had already done 18 hours or so at 149F when I upped the temp. I’m still planning on experimenting too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • StefanGourmet January 15, 2017 at 11:47 pm #

        The optimal cooking time could also depend on the meat, e.g. Grass-fed versus corn-fed or wagyu versus Angus or an older animal versus a yonger animal or a leaner versus more marbled roast… The variables are endless, but unlike cooking a steak or fish fillet on the stove top, the cooking time for sous-vide is pretty flexible in most cases.

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 15, 2017 at 11:52 pm #

        This cut of beef was a grass-fed cow finished with spent hops from a beer brewery. It was the very last of our quarter cow from last year, so it was a year in the freezer. Somehow we had overlooked it as the size of it caused it to get tucked out of the way. Our new quarter cow is completely grass fed. However the 6-pound roast was from the same cow and both the same aged in the freezer. Anyways, I appreciate your feedback. Heading to bed, have to be up in 8 hours. πŸ™‚

        Like

  17. sallybr January 16, 2017 at 8:58 am #

    That is one cut of beef I’ve never tried the sous vide method, I am always super lazy when it comes to cooking something for 24 hours. Which is odd, after all, you do nothing in those 24 hours…

    I need to do this… but I guess you preferred the first method…. what to do? what to do? πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 16, 2017 at 10:07 am #

      I know it’s a conundrum, isn’t it?? I do think my next experiment will to repeat the first method but use flour before searing, as I enjoyed the thicker gravy it produced. Then maybe I’ll have a definitive conclusion. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • sallybr January 16, 2017 at 10:18 am #

        You mean doing the temperature switch and all? Or simply going 48 hours at lower temp?

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 16, 2017 at 10:41 am #

        I mean do the temperature switch. I know I don’t want to do the 48 hours at a lower temp. OR perhaps do 48 hours at the higher temp? Sigh, I can’t decide, lol.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Sheryl January 16, 2017 at 7:38 pm #

    I don’t know much about the sous vide method of cooking, but I learned a lot from reading this post. I really liked all the photos of the meat at the various stages during the process.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. lynne hoareau January 17, 2017 at 2:59 am #

    Yum, yum, yum….I think I am coming over to eat at your house πŸ™‚
    There is a saying that goes…’all good things come to those that wait’….very apt in this case…love it ! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Debbie Spivey January 17, 2017 at 5:11 am #

    Yum! I can just imagine how tender this beef was.

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 17, 2017 at 9:01 am #

      Thank you Debbie, so very tender!

      Like

      • Gastradamus January 26, 2017 at 9:21 pm #

        The Roast looks so good that my mouth is watering. Can’t wait to read about the shrimp meatball below. Can you believe this lady, she’s a cook genius

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 27, 2017 at 5:41 pm #

        Thank you!

        Like

      • Gastradamus January 27, 2017 at 5:42 pm #

        Your welcome

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 27, 2017 at 5:48 pm #

        I work full-time and follow hundreds of blogs, so sometimes it takes me awhile to read them all after work and on the weekends. πŸ™‚

        Like

      • Gastradamus January 27, 2017 at 7:07 pm #

        We are happy to just have to follow our blog, hope its worth the read for you. Hope you ate something good tonight

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 27, 2017 at 7:18 pm #

        Not yet, it’s just after 7 pm here, we eat late. But I had an awesome Reuben sandwich for lunch!

        Like

      • Gastradamus January 27, 2017 at 7:28 pm #

        Reubens are always fantastic. Do you use sour crought?

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 27, 2017 at 7:31 pm #

        I actually had a rare occasion of meeting a friend for lunch at a restaurant today, and yes, saurkraut was on the sandwich. πŸ™‚

        Like

      • Gastradamus January 27, 2017 at 9:11 pm #

        So what’s the difference between brisket and corned beef anyway?

        Liked by 1 person

      • anotherfoodieblogger January 27, 2017 at 10:47 pm #

        Excuse the late reply. Brisket is non-brined cut of beef off the back of the cow, corned beef is pretty much the same cut of beef but has been soaked in a salty/pickling spice brine for up to 5 days before cooking. πŸ™‚

        Like

      • Gastradamus January 28, 2017 at 12:51 am #

        Your like an open book with all the answers and beautiful;)

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Fourth Generation Farmgirl January 28, 2017 at 3:46 pm #

    I only learned about the sous vide method of cooking a short while ago. Apparently, it’s very popular. A number of chefs at local restaurants use it. It really keeps the meat tender. This dish looks fantastic! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • anotherfoodieblogger January 28, 2017 at 3:53 pm #

      Thank you Tonya! I have a few blogger friends that have been using it for a long time, and I finally broke down and bought a machine. Meat comes out incredibly tender! The reason restaurants like it so much is because you can keep the meat in the water bath at a controlled temp until you are ready to finish it off on the grill or pan, but it doesn’t cook any more than the temp you put it at so it’s never overdone.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Kouzounas Kitchen February 26, 2017 at 10:36 pm #

    Sous Vide~ Always the best!!!

    Liked by 1 person

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