Tag Archives: French dish

French Challenge #2 ~ Mains

23 Mar
French Classics Cookbook

French Classics Cookbook

The second challenge using my new French cookbook covers what it entitles “Mains.” I have narrowed it down to three mains I’d like to present to you for voting. Some were easy eliminations, as I have to be able to feed this to my family for dinner. Calves Liver was right out. My husband won’t touch any form of liver with a 10-foot pole. The Pork Chops with Apples and Calvados looked interesting except an apple brandy would be not only be hard to come by in this area, but I doubt it would be worth it to have on hand for the very few dinner guests we ever have. Quiche Lorraine and Coq au Vin… been there, done that. Duck Confit or Fish Stew? I don’t think so with my daughter’s picky eating. So here is the short list, my friends:

Pot au Feu with Cabbage Rolls

Pot au Feu with Cabbage Rolls

Pot au Feu with Cabbage Rolls

Cassoulet

Cassoulet

Cassoulet

Bouef Bourguignon

Bouef Bourguignon

Bouef Bourguignon

You can comment below to vote or on my Facebook pages. You have through Wednesday, March 26 to give me your fave. Many thanks! I look forward to the results. 🙂

Goat’s Cheese SoufflĂ© ~ French Challenge #1

15 Mar
Goat Cheese Souffle

Goat’s Cheese SoufflĂ©

Julia Child I am not! My friends and readers chose Goat’s Cheese SoufflĂ© as the first French dish to cook from my new French cookbook. While the recipe looks deceptively simple to prepare, two hours and many bowls, dishes and pans later, I had concocted some semblance of a soufflĂ©.

Thyme and Cheeses

Thyme and Cheeses ~ Thank you Trader Joe’s!

Two hours??? Oh my goodness. I was tired and sad at the end of the process when I realized all I had to eat for my efforts was one small appetizer and a sink full of dirty dishes. I had halved the recipe and made three soufflés so everyone in the family could have one.

While I followed the recipe exactly, I think I over-folded the egg whites into the cheese mixture. I also had to bump the oven up to 400 degrees and bake for well over a half-hour before I got my soufflĂ©s to puff up a bit and start to brown. While I am patting myself on the back for taking on this challenge, I do not foresee making this dish again. But all in all it was a good experience. One thing I do know is French cooking takes a LOT of patience. AND my husband ate it, too, after claiming he can’t stand goat’s cheese. So there was some success in that department.

Later in the week you can help me decide what to make for French Challenge #2: Mains.

Goat Cheese Souffle

Goat’s Cheese SoufflĂ©

Goat’s Cheese SoufflĂ©
Adapted from The Australian Women’s Weekly French Classics cookbook

2 tablespoons butter
3/4 cup milk
1 sprig fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
1/8 cup flour
1 egg yolk
2 egg whites
2 ounces goat’s cheese (Chevre), crumbled
3 tablespoons heavy cream
1/4 cup Gruyère cheese, grated

Grease 3 small ramekins with one tablespoon of butter, divided. Line each base with baking paper. Place the dishes in a large baking pan.

Heat milk, thyme and bay leaf in a small saucepan until simmering. Strain into a heat-proof dish (I used my Pyrex measuring cup). Melt a tablespoon of butter in the same pan, add the floor, then slowly pour in the hot milk. Cook and stir over medium low heat until thickened and bubbly.

Zak Spoon

Turn a boring milk shot into fun with a Zak spoon! Thank you Ranting Chef!

Transfer to a large bowl and stir in the egg yolk. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set aside to cool for about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees and set a kettle of water on to boil.

Beat the egg whites in a small bowl with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Fold a quarter of the egg whites into the cheese sauce, then fold in the goat’s cheese and the rest of the egg whites. Do NOT overfold! (I think that was my problem.) Spoon the mixture into the ramekins, then add enough boiling water to the baking dish to come half-way up the sides of the ramekins.

Bake the souffles for at least a half an hour, until they are puffy and browned. Carefully remove ramekins from water and cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes.

Souffles in Ramekins

Soufflés in Ramekins

Run a knife around the soufflés, then gently turn each over onto a plate. Next carefully flip each of the soufflés back over into small baking dishes. Pour one tablespoon cream over the soufflés, then sprinkle with the  grated Gruyère cheese. Bake the soufflés in the oven on high broil, until cheese is bubbly and lightly brown. Serve as a light brunch with toast and jam.

Goat Cheese Souffle

Goat’s Cheese SoufflĂ©

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